NCAT: A New View


Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

AFFORDABILITY

NCAT INDUSTRY AFFORDABILITY TASK FORCE

DEFENSE MANUFACTURING COUNCIL SUPPORT

Characterization of Commercial Parts
Process Maturity
Cost As An Independent Variable
Quick Review of DODD 5000.1 And DODI 5000.2

RELATED ACTIVITIES

Integrated Product Process Development
Dual -Use Technology
Defense Manufacturing Conferences
S & T Affordability Workshop
Roundtables

SUMMARY

SUMMARY OF PRODUCTS DELIVERED


INTRODUCTION

Now in its ninth year of existence, the National Center for Advanced Technologies (NCAT) was founded as a non-profit research and education foundation to provide a bridge between government, industry and academia, and to encourage cooperative efforts on technology development.

NCAT's initial years were dedicated to the development and publication of eight national strategic plans for technology development under the umbrella program "Key Technologies for the Year 2000." On completion of that program in 1992, NCAT turned its efforts toward affordability. This paper describes NCAT's affordability activity in recent years and offers a view of future discussion topics.

While commercial industry understands affordability, government agencies generally accord top priority to performance, and cost becomes a secondary consideration. To reconcile these different perspectives, NCAT developed a "big picture" view of affordability that centers on the efficient application of product and process technology. The original objectives were expanded to include:

NCAT has developed a rapport between industry, government and academia It is a relationship based on trust and cooperation in areas of mutual interest; it represents a truly new perspective that provides a model for continuous industry dialogue with the Department of Defense (DoD) and could well be applied to other industry/government relationships.

While NCAT was growing, it developed a process which provides both a top-down and a bottom-up perspective on issues of interest. This process which includes a high level policy group and a series of subgroups working specific topics, has been applied effectively to activities for DoD, National Air and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC). Figure 1 shows graphically how the activity has grown and blossomed. The top branches are generally activities that were being worked with many organizations aiming for consensus issues. The lower branches describe NCAT activities for DoD that are also of interest to other agencies.

Figure 1: NCAT Activities in Retrospect
The three topics at the start of the upper branch (Smart Engines, Fly By Light-Power By Wire (FBL-PBW), and Remote Sensing) were outgrowths of the Key Technologies program effort. Initiated by a series of small meetings, they were cooperative efforts that brought principals together to look at common objectives. Smart Engines resulted in turbine engine demonstrations of technology to stop an engine surge or rotating stall. FBL-PBW generated a Technology Reinvestment Proposal selection and joint funding of almost $100 million. Remote Sensing provided information for the development of national space policy papers on commercialization and technology export. NCAT acted as the facilitator for these topics, then phased out as a team replaced the ad hoc group.

The technology transfer activity was part of a NASA grant effort aimed at reviewing the agency's Integrated Technology Plan for space. It produced support for a NASA/industry survey of facilities, workshops and discussions of specific topics, and a briefing to the NASA Advisory Council by NCAT and the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA) Space Committee.

The Aeronautics Materials and Manufacturing Technologies (AMMT) effort, a new approach to government/industry cooperation, was undertaken for the NSTC. NCAT was asked to determine industry's needs in the area of aircraft structures (through a workshop and development of white papers), then an AMMT government/industry/academia working group reviewed ongoing government activities that were responsive to industry's needs. The obvious gaps were in the area of affordability, an "ility" well understood in the commercial marketplace, but not necessarily in government programs. The working group developed a final report that was briefed to a major conference (about 80 experts) and, with additional conference comment, delivered to the NSTC. The AMMT effort took five months from workshop announcement to final report and showed that cooperative industry/government activities could be both effective and efficient.

NCAT participated in planning meetings for the four (1994 - 1997) National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST) spring manufacturing conferences, made presentations, and assisted in the workshops of the manufacturing program. Asked to support the activities of the NSTC in the preparation and performance of the second phase of the Manufacturing Infrastructure effort, NCAT assisted in planning sessions and in activities to form teams for the workshop. A two day workshop involving approximately 75 industry and government participants was orchestrated.

Cooperative effort continued in the NSTC activity on Manufacturing Infrastructure and the Next Generation Manufacturing (NGM) project. In NGM, industry is leading the concerted work of ten separate organizations to develop a view of a typical 21st century manufacturing enterprise and a guide to help companies prepare for the future. NCAT is providing industry leaders for an Executive Advisory Group and administrative support to the project. A major roll-out conference on NGM was held in January 1997. Details of specific enabling efforts will be discussed at the 1997 NIST spring manufacturing conference.

AFFORDABILITY

Concurrent with its multi-agency activity, NCAT started a long term effort with DoD to emphasize affordability in technology demonstrations and in weapon system development. This activity started with the formation of an industry steering group and task teams for specific projects. NCAT worked with industry and government based on the framework of the Key Technologies effort. Figure 2 shows the concept and Figure 3 the executive committee for the Multi-Association Industry Task Force for Affordability. NCAT also contacted other associations and organizations interested in affordability and included representatives for most of the task force activities. (shown schematically in Figure 4). It is the "honest broker" approach; bringing the right people into the activity to provide the best industry-government product.

Figure 2 Replicating the Key Technology Process for Manufacturing Capability

Figure 3 The Executive Committee

Figure 4 The Defense Manufacturing Council Interface

NCAT INDUSTRY AFFORDABILITY TASK FORCE

As part of an effort to provide industry expertise and viewpoints relative to Manufacturing Science & Technology, NCAT acts as the secretariat for the Multi-Association Industry Task Force on Affordability. This work includes describing potential pilots for demonstrating and proofing concepts formulated by industry expertise, maintaining an information system to insure distribution of meeting-related reports and other industry products, and disseminating results throughout government, industry and academia to participants in the task force and other related team efforts. The task force was created in 1993 to pursue studies in affordability for the Deputy Director for Research and Engineering (DDR&E).

The task force originally was supported with voluntary resources from seven industry associations; Aerospace Industries Association (AIA), Electronics Industry Association (EIA), American Defense Preparedness Association (ADPA), American Electronics Association (AEA), Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME), Association of Manufacturing Technology (AMT), and National Security Industrial Association (NSIA). That core group has been expanded to embrace a wider spectrum of industry, including private sector commercial firms and their respective industry associations. Volunteer industry/government teams have been operating together, under the coordination and orchestration of NCAT, to perform studies and workshop activities to address problematic areas of concern to both government and industry. Typically, the industry groups would respond or input an "industry viewpoint" to government operational activities. NCAT's value-added activity resulted in an "honest broker" effort to coalesce the consensus opinions and make input to the DoD as objective, non-parochial industry opinions. These "sounding board" opinions have provided helpful inputs to many government decision makers.

DEFENSE MANUFACTURING COUNCIL SUPPORT

The Multi-Association Industry Task Force for Affordability was selected to act as the window to industry for the Defense Manufacturing Council (DMC), a high level Office of the Secretary for Defense (OSD) group consisting of the staff of Dr. Kaminski, Under Secretary of Defense (USD), Acquisition & Technology (A&T). The Task Force was invited to participate with the DMC in a review session of the DMC's strategic planning documents. NCAT was asked to provide expanded expertise to cover a broader range of commercial companies and associations not usually involved in defense acquisitions. Attendees for the DMC review included the Chemical Manufacturers Association (CMA), the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA), Information Technology Industry Council (ITI) [formerly Computer & Business Equipment Manufacturers Association (CBEMA)], the Armed Forces Communication & Electronics Association (AFCEA), and several commercial and small business companies. Twenty-six industry representatives at the senior vice president and director level participated. Read-ahead material and agenda were coordinated with the DMC Secretariat prior to their distribution to all the participants.

The Defense Manufacturing Council/Industry Affordability Task Force workshop (January 19, 1995) started with briefings by each of the DMC Team Leaders, followed by discussion among the industry contingent. The industry team selected four from the group to become "spokesmen" to respond to each of the initiatives -- John DeCaire, President, National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) (Pilots as Agents of Change); John Ramsey, Vice President, Operations, Space & Strategic Missiles Sector, Lockheed Martin (Process Maturation); Jerry Ennis, Vice President, Prototype Center, McDonnell Douglas (Cost as an Independent Variable), Mike Robinson, Director of Business Development, Rockwell (Cost Incentives). Each consolidated the views of the entire group and presented these views during the afternoon session.

The four topic areas were reviewed in open discussion for the balance of the afternoon. The proceedings of the meeting were published as a "White Paper" by NCAT in March 1995.

While this activity was the start of joint efforts between the industry task force and the Defense Manufacturing Council, several similar efforts over the past two years developed an excellent working relationship between industry and the government participants. Some examples are:

RELATED ACTIVITIES

There are several activities of NCAT not directly related to the previous topics of Affordability, The Affordability Task Force or DMC. Most of these can be characterized as education and outreach activities; to bring new practices and policies into widespread general use, particularly through cooperative efforts of industry, government and academia. NCAT plays an important role in these activities as a facilitator of change.

SUMMARY

The National Center for Advanced Technologies (NCAT) has grown over the last five years and it has truly provided a new perspective. While NCAT began life working Key Technologies for the Year 2000, it is now looking at processes as well as technologies. This is evident in the work for DoD on affordability and in the work for the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) on Aerospace Materials and Manufacturing Technologies. NCAT now views technology development as one part of a much larger process that is of mutual interest to both government and industry. NCAT has developed a "big picture" view incorporating Integrated Product Process Development (IPPD) and an excellent mechanism for industry, government and academia interaction. The organization has fostered a change in viewpoint, but a change in culture requiring considerable education and training still lies ahead. NCAT stands ready to work that problem.

Industry and government can cooperate and learn from each other, but there is need for a better way to accelerate change. Commercial industry is drastically reducing cycle time while government programs seem to be unduly stretched. However, with increased emphasis on simulation and modeling, information technology and management concepts including Integrated Product Process Development, Integrated Product Teams, Cost As an Independent Variable and Evolutionary Defense Acquisition, the idea of a few "stalking horse" programs looks attractive. Advanced Technology Demonstrations and Advanced Concept Technology Demonstrations could be used as examples, both good and bad, for future acquisition efforts. NCAT can provide a good discussion forum for such topics.

SUMMARY OF PRODUCTS DELIVERED

GLOSSARY

A&T Acquisition and Technology
ACTD Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration
AEA American Electronic Association
AFCEA Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association
AIA Aerospace Industries Association
AMMT Aeronautics Materials and Manufacturing Technologies
AMT Association of Manufacturing Technology
ATD Advanced Technology Demonstration
CAIV Cost As an Independant Variable
CBEMA Computer and Business Equipment Manufacturers Association
CMA Chemical Manufacturers Association
CMM Capability Maturity Models
COSSI Commercial Operations and Support Savings Initiative
DDR&;E Director, Defense Research and Engineering
DMC Defense Manufacturing Council
DoC Department of Commerce
DoD Department of Defense
EDA Evolutionary Defense Acquisition
EIA Electronic Industries Association
FBL-PBW Fly By Light-Power By Wire
GIT Georgia Institute of Technology
IC Integrated Circuit
ICOG International Cooperative Opportunities Group
IPPD Integrated Product Process Development
ITAA Information Technology Association of America
ITI Information Technology Industry Council
MS&T Manufacturing Science and Technology
NASA National Air and Space Administration
NCAT National Center for Advanced Technologies
NCMS National Center for Manufacturing Science
NGM Next Generation Manufacturing
NIST National Institute of Standards and Technology
NSIA National Security Industrial Association
NSTC National Science and Technology Council
NTU National Technological University
OSD Office of the Secretary of Defense
PBBE Performance Based Business Environment
S&T Science and Technology
SME Society of Manufacturing Engineers
SPI Single Process Initiative
USD Under Secretary of Defense
VECP Value Engineering Change Proposal

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